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Nominative Determinism - Slight Return

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Strawberry
919202.  Sun Jun 24, 2012 7:29 am Reply with quote

When i found a fact for the String the Quite Interesting thread, i discovered that there was a railway magnate called george francis train.

 
djgordy
926163.  Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:48 pm Reply with quote

On tonight's "University Challenge" there was team from St. George's medical school. Their captain was called Smoker.

 
suze
926180.  Mon Jul 23, 2012 4:30 pm Reply with quote

She was Irish. Although in fact, the fairly uncommon surname Smoker is Saxon - it originally referred to a person who made smocks.



All in all, there were some fairly uncommon names on tonight's show. Middleton is common enough, and so are Sivaji and Mindel in Marathi and European Jewish communities respectively.

Gratrex (more often encountered as Greatrex or Greatorex) is peculiar to the English Midlands; it referred to the Great Rakes lead mine in the village of Carsington, not far from Matlock.

Gallant is Norman, but found mainly in East Anglia. It originally referred to a man who chased anything in a skirt.

The name Suebsaeng is Thai, although that player very clearly went to an English public school and doesn't look Thai.

Amber Ace sounds like a porn star, but in fact the name has a very long history despite being rather uncommon. It's Frankish (Frankish was the precursor of Dutch, approximately), and means "noble". British owners of the name are found mostly in Scotland.

 
djgordy
926214.  Tue Jul 24, 2012 12:37 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
.

Gratrex (more often encountered as Greatrex or Greatorex) is peculiar to the English Midlands; it referred to the Great Rakes lead mine in the village of Carsington, not far from Matlock.


I nearly had girlf called Greatorex. We're from Derby.

Quote:
Gallant is Norman, but found mainly in East Anglia. It originally referred to a man who chased anything in a skirt.



Such as Scotsmen and hovercraft.

 
Spud McLaren
926477.  Tue Jul 24, 2012 3:43 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
I nearly had girlf called Greatorex. We're from Derby.
Possibly related to the Greatorexes who lived and kept a butchers' shop in Raven St/Harrison St?

 
djgordy
926549.  Wed Jul 25, 2012 3:43 am Reply with quote

Various remarks come to mind but they are mostly too rude even for me to post. There are quite a few Greatorexs around the region and presumably they are all related to some degree.

 
Awitt
926556.  Wed Jul 25, 2012 4:15 am Reply with quote

Like the small town in eastern Germany where my dad told me the butcher, baker and candlestick maker, so to speak, all had our surname.

 
cornixt
926686.  Wed Jul 25, 2012 10:33 am Reply with quote

I would have assumed it was a made up name from the Asterix comics.

 
Spud McLaren
926737.  Wed Jul 25, 2012 2:33 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Gratrex (more often encountered as Greatrex or Greatorex) is peculiar to the English Midlands; it referred to the Great Rakes lead mine in the village of Carsington, not far from Matlock.
Well, we can agree it's from Derbyshire, but

"The first record of the name is in the Derbyshire Archives in the year AD 1251 as GRET(E)RACHES a small farming settlement, now known as Great Rocks Farm it is in the high peak of Derbyshire, midway between Buxton and Tideswell and three miles from Wormhill village. (Wormhill is spelled as WRUENELE in the Domesday Book of AD 1086 and as WERMEHILL in AD 1273 in the Lichfield Charters.) The settlement of Gretraches was probably founded shortly after AD 1086 and definitely before AD 1200 then the use of place-names as surnames had died out in England. It is not mentioned in the Domesday Book."

- from this site, which also mentions Carsington/Hopton.

 
Oceans Edge
929133.  Wed Aug 01, 2012 1:08 pm Reply with quote

and in reverse nominative determinism...

Brad Anguish - HRM's Director of Recreational Services

 
djgordy
934391.  Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:34 pm Reply with quote

Nadir: Noun:

The lowest point in the fortunes of a person or organization.

Quote:
Asil Nadir, the Turkish Cypriot businessman and Conservative Party donor at the centre of one of Britainís biggest fraud trials, was found guilty on Wednesday of a further seven charges of theft.

That takes to 10 the total number of counts on which a jury at the Old Bailey in London has convicted Mr Nadir, following guilty verdicts on three theft charges on Monday.


www.ft.com/cms/s/0/9795df1a-ec4a-11e1-a91c-00144feab49a.html#axzz24Ik8whv9

 
tetsabb
934399.  Wed Aug 22, 2012 2:08 pm Reply with quote

This article, on circumcision for male children, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-19072761, includes a quote from a Dr Wang, and a mother whose surname is 'Loveless'; you would have thought that she had had love at least once....

 
NinOfEden
934406.  Wed Aug 22, 2012 2:23 pm Reply with quote

Maybe it was an IVF kid.

 
RLDavies
934437.  Wed Aug 22, 2012 3:16 pm Reply with quote

Agatha Christie used the name Greatorex once or twice in her stories. That's the only place I've ever encountered it.

The name Honeybun is restricted to a small area of Dorset, probably all tracing back to a single ancestor (who, presumably, baked tasty treats). Colin knew a couple of Honeybuns at school.

 
Spud McLaren
939858.  Mon Sep 17, 2012 4:10 pm Reply with quote

Heinrich Knote

Yes I know you pronounce the K, but still...

 

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